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Archive for February, 2018

OpenTTD Enhanced Gameplay

OpenTTD is an open-source clone of the Transport Tycoon series of transport business simulation games. While it’s a lot of fun to play, especially multiplayer, the default gameplay quickly becomes old or stale to experienced players:

  • There’s a runaway effect where if you accumulate enough wealth, it’s almost impossible to lose. The game quickly degrades into a painting game where you can run transportation networks virtually anywhere without penalty.
  • The variety of industries is low making it easy to connect all available industries in a short amount of time. There are only so many times you can transport the same type of cargo over and over before boredom sets in.
  • Industries disappear if you don’t transport cargo to them within a few years, leaving the map an empty wasteland instead of a puzzle of industries waiting to be serviced.
  • Rail upgrades are tedious when monorail and maglev become available. To upgrade from one type to another, you need to move all existing trains to a depot, sell them all, upgrade the tracks, then create all new trains of the new type. That’s not realistic, and it’s not fun.
  • Passengers are just cargo and don’t feel like a unique part of the rail network.

The runaway effect can be solved by changing the ‘Infrastructure Maintenance‘ option (set to false by default) to true. This means any infrastructure (such as rails and rail signals) have a recurring maintenance fee. This heavily penalizes random, long-distance builds, but rewards re-use and efficiency of infrastructure. It’s very easy now to bankrupt yourself even in the late game with this turned on, so builds need to be thought out strategically instead of just built out like a model railway set.

FIRS is a complete industry replacement set that’s been in development for years. The developers have carefully planned out complex economies that make for interesting, dynamic gameplay. For example, you might want to start with a company that specializes in transporting oil products, or metal cargoes. Each of these sub-economies are each individually more complex than the default OpenTTD economy.


(You should be able to see an enlarged, up to date version of the economy map here, but that link might go stale as this article ages.)

A lot of the economy in FIRS is circular. For example, you can run iron ore from a mine to a steel mill. The mill produces metal, which you can take to a smithy. Then the smithy makes engineering supplies from that metal, which you can run back to the iron ore mine. This increases production at the mine due to the increased efficiency of having engineering supplies on hand. This makes for very interesting and rewarding gameplay and solves the low industry variety problem of stock OpenTTD.

FIRS also allows you to manipulate how industries open or close. Changing “Allow secondary industries to close” to “off” fixes the ‘industries disappear’ problem. Now all industries on the map at generation time will remain there until the end of the game, presenting an interesting puzzle to be solved over time instead of a race against the clock to supply industries before they disappear.

FIRS combined with the Iron Horse train set completely eliminates monorail and maglev vehicles available in stock OpenTTD. This is because FIRS mainly concerns itself with transporting cargoes by regular rail only. Transporting passengers is possible (between towns and hotels), but such routes are not as profitable as a full industry loop is. FIRS is an industry-focused set. This leaves the door open to add in a few more sets to OpenTTD that concentrate on transporting passengers:

  • FooBar’s Tram Tracks for trams and trollies moving small numbers of passengers within a city or between two cities close to each other,
  • Metro Track Set to transport massive numbers of passengers over short distances,
  • Maglev Track Set which offers many high speed rail tracks capable of transporting passengers long distances at very high speeds.

Typically in the real world passenger rail networks (commuter rail, subways, or LRT’s) are segregated from heavy freight railway networks. These track sets allow the construction of unique passenger rail networks with distinctly different properties. Since FIRS doesn’t concern itself much with moving passengers around, these sets fit the missing piece of the puzzle very well.

Since FIRS combined with Iron Horse don’t provide monorail or maglev, there’s no need to upgrade your freight network from regular rail (be it steam, electric, or diesel.) Regular, “heavy” rail will remain in use throughout the game from beginning to end as a core part of gameplay, which wasn’t true in stock OpenTTD.

In the early game, simple tram stations stimulate city growth. In the late game, only high speed rail operates at very high speeds (up to 600kph), but since high speed rail can only transport passengers or mail, it can’t be abused like in stock OpenTTD to transport heavy industrial cargoes. This makes for much more interesting gameplay with a great amount of variety. It also eliminates the need to tediously upgrade your freight network from standard rail to maglev or monorail, and creates realistic passenger networks.

These late-game passenger networks take on a look similar to Taiwan’s High Speed Rail, or Japan’s Shinkansen network.

With all of these modifications, OpenTTD is transformed into a long-running, complex simulation with high difficulty and strong variation between games. It remains interesting throughout as key milestones are reached. We like to start at the year 1860 to allow for a long time to develop the freight networks:

  • 1860: Game begins, only steam locomotives available.
  • 1872: Trams become available, offering early city development opportunities.
  • 1900: Metro becomes available, high-density passenger transport over short distances.
  • 1919: Electric trains available, seamless upgrade of existing freight rail network to electric.
  • 1954: Diesel trains available.
  • 1984: High Speed Rail begins to unlock.
  • 2051: Game over.

The end result is a complex freight network that covers the entire map, densely built cities with tight metro systems, and long lines of high speed passenger railways.

As of this writing, here are the exact versions of each NewGRF set used. The station sets are cosmetic only, but are great for building unique stations:

A Fish Out of Water

Ever since I was a kid, I had a deep appreciation and respect for the demoscene. I instantly fell in love with Starshine, Ice Frontier, and Bridge to the Universe. Never in my life did I think I would have an opportunity to mingle with the talented computer hackers, musicians, and artists that made up the core of the demoscene engine. But, ten years ago, it happened. This is my story.

The Digital Garden

Ever since the mid 1990’s, I’ve been a fan of the demoscene. The only thing I had back then was a 386 with a couple megs worth of RAM and a few dozen megs worth of hard drive space. I was introduced to the demoscene by Damage on EFnet when he sent me a copy of Purple Motion’s “Starshine,” a tune that can still be found on my playlist to this day. I couldn’t really run any demos back then, my computer just wasn’t fast enough, but these days that’s not really a problem.

Back then I had troubles running a 16-channel S3M on my slow 386 (I eventually could do it by selecting 8-bit mono for the sound settings,) but now demoscene music composers just release their music as MP3 or OGG. What my full-size desktop 386 couldn’t play 15 years ago, a tiny ipod the size of a cigarette lighter can play without missing a beat.

These days, the biggest hurdle for me and my ability to watch demos in their native environment is the fact that I choose to run Linux instead of Windows. Fortunately, groups are releasing their demos in all sorts of various movie formats (including full-HD formats,) something that really wasn’t possible (or at least easy) even in the early 2000’s. Being able to watch a demo in full 1080p with the sound booming is a great experience.

Once I found out that I was going to Germany – something that came about by pure luck – I decided to do some research on whether or not there would be any demoscene events happening while I was there. As luck would have it, the biggest pure demoscene event in the world, Breakpoint 2008, would be occuring over the Easter long weekend. I had long read about these parties, legendary events where people code for days on end and get next to no sleep. I was excited to watch the new demo releases, listen to demoscene music all day long, and possibly to meet some people from all over the demoscene.

After weeks of waiting, the tension from 14 years of demoparty denial having built up to a fevered pitch, the day finally came. I took an InterCityExpress (ICE) train to Frankfurt Airport, where my intention was not to board an airplane, but to transfer to another train heading due west to Bingen-am-Rhein.

On the train to Bingen, I met a devoted, long-time scener and tried to strike up conversation. He asked me what production I was bringing to the show. Sheepishly, the best I could muster were my recent efforts working with Synchronet. You see, the demoscene is about contribution. It does not tolerate ‘consumers’ who do not contribute. Even fanatic demoscene consumers (such as myself) were considered lamers. Contribution was required to be a member of this community.

Bingen-am-Rhein could easily be considered the crown jewel of Germany. I checked into my hotel overlooking the river, taking a few minutes to watch the trains gracefully slink around the opposing side of the river from my room. Gorgeous.

I caught the Breakpoint shuttle to the demoparty location, where I stepped into the first demoparty experience of my life. The party was set up in a large sports hall, with tables lined up one after another, seats arranged all around. Two gigabit switches were placed on each table. It’s about at this point when I realized that I had brought no CAT5 cable with me, so I had to spend 5 Euro to buy a short cable from the front desk. No matter, it would come in handy later.

As I toured the tables trying to find a place to sit, I noticed that each seat had a sheet of paper in front of it marked with the group that was designated to sit there. “TRSI,” “Farbraush,” “ASD;” these were all some of the biggest names in the demoscene. The huge projector to the front of the hall was displaying announcements on a fancy slideshow program. As I prowled through the mess of tables and chairs, it was becoming increasingly clear that there were just no seats available — the papers with group names were everywhere. Then, an announcement popped up on the screen at the front noting that the papers were all meaningless; all empty chairs were up for grabs and there was no such thing as a reserved seat.

So, I sat down in a seat marked for “Still,” at the very end, so that I wouldn’t inconvenience the group too much. Of course, about thirty minutes later, the guys from Still showed up and weren’t too impressed that I was taking up one of their seats. I think the only saving grace in that case was the fact that I was Canadian — it’s just so rare for a Canadian to show up to a demoparty that I was a bit of a spectacle all unto myself.

That seat marked my life for the next four days.

While I was at Breakpoint, I got to experience and witness some of the best programming talent on the planet. All of it was displayed in glorious 1080p for everyone to see. Farbraush wowed everyone with Masagin. TRSI showed off their ‘wannabee’ demo 2nd Element. The best I could muster was helping a kid who grew up in East Germany install a copy of XBMC onto his obsolete PC while the sweet tunes of “Remark Music” blared and coders more talented than I drunkenly pounded away at assembly code on their C64’s.

On the train back to N├╝rnberg, where my job as a “Microsoft Excel spreadsheet master” awaited, I felt inadequate. There was no way I could ever measure up to any of these people in my lifetime. They knew that too, but even so, they were polite enough to welcome me into their home for four days and have a glimpse at what they were up to. For them, Breakpoint was sacred ground, and they shared that with me. For that, I am eternally grateful.

A year later, I was watching the livestream of Breakpoint 2009 from home, where I was recovering from having my wisdom teeth pulled. This was where Rgba & TBC wowed the world with Elevated.

A year after that, Breakpoint was no more.